4 May – global protest day

By Vincent Kolo
This article first appeared in Chinaworker.info on 29 March 2018
Link to original article: HERE

Noam Chomsky among signatories of worldwide petition launched by Stop Repression in Hong Kong campaign

The Stop Repression in Hong Kong campaign is planning a day of worldwide protests on Friday 4 May. We urge readers around the world to participate in the protests against increasing political repression in Hong Kong and China. More information and campaign material can be found here. Continue reading “4 May – global protest day”

Hong Kong independence ideas must be suppressed, top China official Wang Huning warns city

By Tony Cheung
This article first appeared in South China Morning Post on 6 March 2018
Link to original article: HERE

Fifth-ranking Politburo Standing Committee member urges Hongkongers to strengthen their sense of national identity, promising more initiatives to help them reap the benefits of the Greater Bay Area project

China’s propaganda tsar on Tuesday warned that Continue reading “Hong Kong independence ideas must be suppressed, top China official Wang Huning warns city”

Why China won’t let people compare Xi Jinping with an imperial predecessor

By Isabella Jackson
This article first appeared in The Conversation on 5 March 2018
Link to original article: HERE

The Chinese Communist Party’s legitimacy is largely based on a supposed contrast between its “enlightened” leadership and the despotism of “Old China”. Any hint that the party is creating a new emperor must therefore be quashed. But the Chinese public know their history, and history is a potent political force Continue reading “Why China won’t let people compare Xi Jinping with an imperial predecessor”

China’s Predictive Policing and “Digital Totalitarianism”

China Digital Times: 

’s Maya Wang warned this week about Chinese authorities’ combination of data from video surveillance, face and license plate recognition, mobile device locations, and official records to identify targets for detention in . The report is the latest of many highlighting intensive Continue reading “China’s Predictive Policing and “Digital Totalitarianism””

Hong Kong’s Debarring of Pro-Democracy Lawmakers Casts Doubt on Poll: Report

RFA: Luisetta Mudie

The removal of elected pro-democracy lawmakers from office and the disqualification of fresh candidates by election officials ahead of Sunday‘s Legislative Council (LegCo) by election in Hong Kong has cast doubt on the legitimacy of the forthcoming poll, a rights group has said.

The “political screening” of Continue reading “Hong Kong’s Debarring of Pro-Democracy Lawmakers Casts Doubt on Poll: Report”

Hong Kong democratic opposition fails to regain veto power in legislature

Reuters:Venus Wu

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong’s pro-democracy camp failed on Monday to regain some veto power in the city’s legislature in a pivotal by-election, struggling to draw what they hoped would be protest votes against creeping control from Communist Party rulers in Beijing.

The democrats won only two Continue reading “Hong Kong democratic opposition fails to regain veto power in legislature”

Journalism NGO reports ‘unprecedented hardship’ for Hong Kong’s media industry and ‘bleak’ trends in China

HKFP:Karen Cheung

The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) has noted “unprecedented hardship” in Hong Kong’s media industry in a new report, as well as “an overall negative trajectory for press freedom” in China.

The global press freedom union began monitoring China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan in 2008, when the authorities promised a more free media ahead Continue reading “Journalism NGO reports ‘unprecedented hardship’ for Hong Kong’s media industry and ‘bleak’ trends in China”

Tibetan language petitioner on trial for ‘separatism’

This article was published in the New York Times with the headline ‘How China Used a Times Documentary as Evidence Against Its Subject’

NYTIMES: JONAH M. KESSEL

https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004031427

During the eight years I lived in China, people would often say they felt as if they had no voice under Communist Party rule. This was especially true for minorities.

So when Tashi Wangchuk, a Tibetan herder turned shopkeeper, showed up at my apartment in Beijing in the spring of 2015, I of course wanted to listen to his story.

He told me the Chinese authorities on the Tibetan Plateau had been slowly eradicating the Tibetan language from schools and the business world. Mr. Tashi believed prohibiting the study of the Tibetan language went against China’s constitution. Continue reading “Tibetan language petitioner on trial for ‘separatism’”