Edward Yiu hits back at threat of by-election ban

This article was published in the HKFP with the headline ‘Hong Kong gov’t wouldn’t dare to bar me from running for legislature again, says by-election hopeful Edward Yiu’

HKFP : Kris Cheng

Former lawmaker Edward Yiu says he believes the government would not bar him from running in the Legislative Council by-election in March, given the strong mandate he obtained in Sunday’s pro-democracy camp primary election.

Yiu, who was disqualified from the legislature by a court in 2016 over the additional lines he added to his oath of office, has often been asked about the risk of being barred from running again.

“The government would not dare to Continue reading “Edward Yiu hits back at threat of by-election ban”

Free Tibetan activist Tashi Wangchuk

Calling for the right to use Tibetan language in schools is not a crime

Adam N. Lee, chinaworker.info

A nine-minute video made by the New York Times may cost Tibetan language rights activist Tashi Wangchuk fifteen years in prison. He is the latest victim in an unprecedented crackdown in which hundreds of dissidents and rights advocates have been arrested, abducted, disappeared, tortured, forced to appear in televised ‘confessions’ and in many cases served with harsh prison sentences as a deterrent to others who would challenge Beijing’s policies. Continue reading “Free Tibetan activist Tashi Wangchuk”

Tibetan language petitioner on trial for ‘separatism’

This article was published in the New York Times with the headline ‘How China Used a Times Documentary as Evidence Against Its Subject’



During the eight years I lived in China, people would often say they felt as if they had no voice under Communist Party rule. This was especially true for minorities.

So when Tashi Wangchuk, a Tibetan herder turned shopkeeper, showed up at my apartment in Beijing in the spring of 2015, I of course wanted to listen to his story.

He told me the Chinese authorities on the Tibetan Plateau had been slowly eradicating the Tibetan language from schools and the business world. Mr. Tashi believed prohibiting the study of the Tibetan language went against China’s constitution. Continue reading “Tibetan language petitioner on trial for ‘separatism’”

A January of discontent: Hong Kong’s crackdown on pro-democracy activists gathers pace

Kong Tsung-gan, HKFP

The unprecedented Hong Kong government crackdown on the pro-democracy movement continues apace, and this month is set to be its busiest yet. Below is an overview of January court dates in government prosecutions of pro-democracy leaders and activists: four trials definitely, six trials probably, and 55 defendants.

Since the 2014 Umbrella Movement, the Hong Kong government, under the influence if not direction of the Communist Party, has carried out a wide-ranging and unprecedented attack on the pro-democracy movement.

This attack has taken several forms, including the suddenly imposed requirement of new loyalty pledges by candidates for public office, the Electoral Affairs Commission’s arbitrary disqualification of potential candidates on political grounds, the denial of public space – including venues for demonstrations and New Year’s market stalls – on spurious grounds of “public safety”, and the refusal to register political groups such as Demosistō. Continue reading “A January of discontent: Hong Kong’s crackdown on pro-democracy activists gathers pace”

China shuts 128,000 ‘harmful’ websites in 2017: state media

Report by SCMP

Announcement comes as the authorities tighten control of content on the internet, amid already routine censorship of the media

China shut as many as 128,000 websites that contained obscene and other “harmful” information in 2017, the state-run Xinhua news agency reported late on Monday, citing government data.

Xinhua said 30.9 million illegal publications were confiscated over the course of the year, while 1,900 people were subject to criminal penalties, according to figures from the national office in charge of combating pornography and illegal publications.

China has been tightening controls over internet content as part of efforts to maintain “social stability”, taking on “vulgar” and pornographic content as well as the unauthorised dissemination of news. Continue reading “China shuts 128,000 ‘harmful’ websites in 2017: state media”

Stop Repression in Hong Kong – campaign video

This short video, featuring ousted Hong Kong lawmaker Leung Kwok-hung (Long Hair) and Sally Tang Mei-ching of Socialist Action (CWI in Hong Kong) has been produced by the Stop Repression in Hong Kong campaign.

Less than four minutes long, the video shows  how the democracy struggle in Hong Kong has come under unprecedented attack in the past 12 months. One-fifth of the opposition in the legislature has been thrown out by the government and the courts on the flimsiest of pretexts. Young democracy activists have been served with harsh jail terms. Dozens of new political trials are looming in the first months of 2018.

The Chinese dictatorship is determined to stamp out Hong Kong’s culture of mass protests for democracy, which it fears could spread to China. Pressure is building from Beijing for the Hong Kong government – it’s puppet – to implement Article 23 national security laws that would massively curtail freedom of speech and make it a criminal offence to oppose the ruling ‘Communist’ Party (CCP).



Eight year jail sentence for Chinese dissident Wu Gan

State using systematic frame-ups and ‘carrot and stick’ methods to extract confessions

Adam N. Lee, chinaworker.info

On 26 December, the blogger Wu Gan, known by his online nickname Super Vulgar Butcher, was sentenced to eight years in prison by a court in Tianjin. This was the harshest sentence to be passed so far in a state crackdown on activism that began more than two years ago. It is common for China to hold trials of high profile dissidents during the Christmas period, to minimise international media coverage.

Wu was arrested in May 2015, two months before a major crackdown was launched against a group of around 250 lawyers and activists. Known as the ‘709 incident’, these mass arrests marked an escalation of state repression under ‘strongman’ ruler Xi Jinping which has since further intensified. China is currently experiencing its most severe repression since the post-1989 crackdown.

Continue reading “Eight year jail sentence for Chinese dissident Wu Gan”